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Carless in California


For various reasons, we do not own a car despite living deep in American car country. The reasons are largely financial; the cost of living in downtown Mountain View crowds car ownership out of our budget. We pay more to live in a pedestrian friendly neighborhood, so we are less able to afford a car. At the same time, I don't need a car to get to work, and Tara doesn't drive, so any car we had would sit in the carport most of the week. Combine that waste of resources with a reluctance to contribute to the Bay Area's traffic congestion, and forgoing car ownership doesn't sound all that bad.

Car sharing services allow us to grab a vehicle as long as we plan ahead a bit. The Caltrain provides access to San Francisco. There are convenience stores and cafes in walking distance, so we don't feel the absence of a car too often. Last night was one of the few times where I did. After getting home from work, we wanted a dinner cheaper than nearby delivery options. The nearest quick bite came from a fast food place about 1 kilometer down the street. I'm a car, the trip is so fast, it almost feels excessive to drive. On foot, the trip is a bit longer, requires dodging some poorly controlled intersections, and doesn't prove particularly scenic.

I enjoy walking because it clears my head, lets me reflect and unwind a bit. On yesterday's walk, I was surprised by the absence of any other walkers. Make no mistake, this is a car town. Scurry from the driveway to the door, and no further. Children and sometimes the elderly take to the sidewalk, but the bulk of travel relies on four wheels rather than two feet. It's a pity, too. All of that blue sky and sunshine shouldn't go to waste. I don't mind the solitude, I suppose. It's fine to walk, observed by the occasional driver and the rising mountains from which the city takes its name. If folks would rather clutch the wheel and weave among the horde of mobile boxes, I shouldn't judge. I'll just walk tall, stretch my legs, and take in the air.

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